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I recently deleted my truck, running a 60HP gdp tune. I’m wondering if anyone out there would know are suggest the best HP tune to run while towing a 10,000lb travel trailer. Before delete, the truck towed great (haven’t towed since delete yet), but I’m wondering if I should bring back to stock HP, are would taking it easy with the 60hp be ok? I’m new to the delete/ tune world and don’t want to break anything. Any suggestions would be great. And these are fixed tunes, as the SOFT switch is on back order.
 

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I towed a travel trailer around 9600 from FL to TX using CTT 30hp and it towed very nice, went up and down the rolling hills of the panhandle without issue. Guess my only complaint would be range as the tanks a bit small. I had absolute faith in the transmission and driveline on that beast. Not sure if you can even find CTT anymore but I liked it
 

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I personally won’t tow over setting 2, 40hp tune, I don’t want to create extra heat. I tow a 10k lb 38’ bumper pull easily on that tune
 

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2019 Titan XD Pro4x Cummins
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It will depend entirely on how the turbos are setup in the tune. The m2 system appears to be physically setup to encourage a minimum of 2:1 drive pressure, when the ecu calls for more boost it will happily go up to 3:1.
 

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Last season towing 9k in and out of mtns on PD 60hp deleted it did well but post turbo EGT temps can spike quickly (1200f +) downshifting and letting off some is required to cool off. Recently installed the 30hp, I haven’t towed with it yet but plan on using it for the season and back to 60hp off season or lighter towing.
 

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I recently deleted my truck, running a 60HP gdp tune. I’m wondering if anyone out there would know are suggest the best HP tune to run while towing a 10,000lb travel trailer. Before delete, the truck towed great (haven’t towed since delete yet), but I’m wondering if I should bring back to stock HP, are would taking it easy with the 60hp be ok? I’m new to the delete/ tune world and don’t want to break anything. Any suggestions would be great. And these are fixed tunes, as the SOFT switch is on back order.
I am new to the 5.0 Cummins, however I am not new to diesels or to towing. Just judging by the cubes of this motor, I would not turn the hp up very much at all for towing, unless you don't care how long the motor and tranny will last. Short version of my background: drove semis hauling grain out of the field up to 110,000lbs before I was 21. Yes I know that weight is well over the legal limit. No, I am not exaggerating. Have pulled 5th wheels and travel trailers from east Texas to Los Angeles, CA. I have driven many different vehicles, gas and diesel, from a Geo Prizm to a combine (harvester), M577 tracked APC, and the aforementioned Mack hauling corn to the elevator.
Welll, maybe that was not so short. Apologies.
ANYWAY, I am not a newbie. If you want to pull something heavy, fast, there ain't no substitute for large displacement.
Yes, you can do mods and make a a smaller motor do it, but it won't do it very long. When the first Duramax came out, it had much the same hp and tq numbers as the Titan comes stock. If you want to keep it around for a while, keep it pretty damn close to stock.
My opinion is 25, maybe 30 hp gain for towing. Especially if you don't have an egt. Haven't seen or heard of any light duty pickup that comes factory with an EGT gauge.
That's my opinion. If you take that and a dollar bill you might be able to purchase a Dr. Pepper.
Rant finished.
 

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I am new to the 5.0 Cummins, however I am not new to diesels or to towing. Just judging by the cubes of this motor, I would not turn the hp up very much at all for towing, unless you don't care how long the motor and tranny will last. Short version of my background: drove semis hauling grain out of the field up to 110,000lbs before I was 21. Yes I know that weight is well over the legal limit. No, I am not exaggerating. Have pulled 5th wheels and travel trailers from east Texas to Los Angeles, CA. I have driven many different vehicles, gas and diesel, from a Geo Prizm to a combine (harvester), M577 tracked APC, and the aforementioned Mack hauling corn to the elevator.
Welll, maybe that was not so short. Apologies.
ANYWAY, I am not a newbie. If you want to pull something heavy, fast, there ain't no substitute for large displacement.
Yes, you can do mods and make a a smaller motor do it, but it won't do it very long. When the first Duramax came out, it had much the same hp and tq numbers as the Titan comes stock. If you want to keep it around for a while, keep it pretty damn close to stock.
My opinion is 25, maybe 30 hp gain for towing. Especially if you don't have an egt. Haven't seen or heard of any light duty pickup that comes factory with an EGT gauge.
That's my opinion. If you take that and a dollar bill you might be able to purchase a Dr. Pepper.
Rant finished.
Stock these trucks have an egt probe, but it’s removed when deleted which is fucking stupid lol.
 

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If you take that and a dollar bill you might be able to purchase a Dr. Pepper.
Funny, yes, I think now it is well over a dollar these days (sigh). I agree on this engine...it is good but they did pump up the HP from the ISV version for school buses etc. Good to keep within safe limits for longevity. And there is no substitute for cubic inches although with the price of fuel, they do cause more pain.

BTW, as Cajun says above EGT data is available from the ECM. Get something like the ScanGuage II device (or similar devices) and you can monitor several PIDS like EGT and the Soot load % and regen status (if not deleted).
 

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Stock these trucks have an egt probe, but it’s removed when deleted which is fucking stupid lol.
You're absolutely right about that. I'm trying to figure out if I can keep that sensor in service, or if I have to use the dpf temperature probe... but I think it's possible to still drive the exhaust gas temperature gauge in the information display and get it to react to all temperature ranges instead of just reporting one temperature for a range.

Funny, yes, I think now it is well over a dollar these days (sigh). I agree on this engine...it is good but they did pump up the HP from the ISV version for school buses etc. Good to keep within safe limits for longevity. And there is no substitute for cubic inches although with the price of fuel, they do cause more pain.

BTW, as Cajun says above EGT data is available from the ECM. Get something like the ScanGuage II device (or similar devices) and you can monitor several PIDS like EGT and the Soot load % and regen status (if not deleted).
Be careful with that, some of the egt data the ecm puts out is not sampled, it is calculated. ie, ecm thinks it's getting this much fuel and this much air, table says it should have an egt of this.

This is such a tired argument, despite having a measure of truth to it. Engines are air pumps. How much air is pumped through them is what matters, not the physical displacement of the engine. A turbocharged 5.0L at 2:1 pressure ratio is going move a similar, if not more mass of air than a naturally aspirated 10.0L. The 10.0L comes with some stark disadvantages, larger, heavier components, weaker components, more friction and more heat losses.

The 10L is obviously heavier, due to being a larger displacement. The pistons are larger, the cylinders are larger. The cylinder walls must be thicker to accommodate the larger total forces to be absorbed. As is well known, as the inside diamter of a cylinder gets larger, it will eventually reach a point where the total force against against it is greater than the pressure contained within it. Smaller cyclinders are stronger by virtue of having to withstand less pressure across a smaller surface area. Larger cylinders condense a larger portion of the combustion gases, meaning more energy is dumped into the engine as heat instead of leaving the engine as work.

I am new to the 5.0 Cummins, however I am not new to diesels or to towing. Just judging by the cubes of this motor, I would not turn the hp up very much at all for towing, unless you don't care how long the motor and tranny will last. Short version of my background: drove semis hauling grain out of the field up to 110,000lbs before I was 21. Yes I know that weight is well over the legal limit. No, I am not exaggerating. Have pulled 5th wheels and travel trailers from east Texas to Los Angeles, CA. I have driven many different vehicles, gas and diesel, from a Geo Prizm to a combine (harvester), M577 tracked APC, and the aforementioned Mack hauling corn to the elevator.
Welll, maybe that was not so short. Apologies.
ANYWAY, I am not a newbie. If you want to pull something heavy, fast, there ain't no substitute for large displacement.
Yes, you can do mods and make a a smaller motor do it, but it won't do it very long. When the first Duramax came out, it had much the same hp and tq numbers as the Titan comes stock. If you want to keep it around for a while, keep it pretty damn close to stock.
My opinion is 25, maybe 30 hp gain for towing. Especially if you don't have an egt. Haven't seen or heard of any light duty pickup that comes factory with an EGT gauge.
That's my opinion. If you take that and a dollar bill you might be able to purchase a Dr. Pepper.
Rant finished.
What do you know about the engines? Just because you drove a vehicle with an engine doesn't mean you know anything about that engine. How many diesel engines have you been inside? How much of the math have you done to size turbos for diesel and gasoline engines. Experience does not equal knowledge at all times. As I mentioned above, the engine is an air pump. You realise that the ISV red lines at 4250rpm and doesn't start pulling back power until ~3800rpm? At 30psig, that's a lot of air being moved.

The ISV is a significantly different diesel engine than its direct peers. I can't speak to the ford 3.0L v6, or the duramax 3.0, but the big powerstrokes, the duramax and the isb/bt6 are not in the same class of engine as the ISV.

The ISV is an over-square dual over head cam v8. Big focus on the over square. Almost all heavy duty diesel engines are under-square, meaning the stroke is longer than the diameter of the cylinder. The ISV is the other way, the stroke is shorter than the diameter of the cylinder. This has some interesting effects, an over-square engine favors higher rpm, under-square favors lower rpm. This is due to the piston velocity and the relationship to the combustion velocity. There are some disadvantages, such as in low rpm, high torque situations the connecting rod and crank shaft are at a mechanical disadvantage, there is a lot of stress there. They pretty much need a common rail fuel injection system to soften the combustion process or it would end up like the triple nickle did...

Now lets have a moment of honesty. The ISV is too large of an engine for the Titan XD as a half-ton pickup and would be perfect if the XD was a full one-ton. Modern diesels in the 2500/3500 series pickups are massively over powered for the job they're required to do. Drive the rockies, and I'd argue they're dangerously overpowered. "No replacement for displacement" is a simple way of saying "I don't want to figure out the right tool for the job, so let's just go overkill and hope for the best".
 

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Stock these trucks have an egt probe, but it’s removed when deleted which is fucking stupid lol.
I always thought an EGT probe should be installed in the exhaust manifold before the turbo. The reason being that you keep an eye on the temperature that could be dangerous to the life of the turbo. My Titan only has what looks to be an exhaust emissions temperature gauge without any numbers. Just a bar graph L to H. I will try to check in to that at some point.
You're absolutely right about that. I'm trying to figure out if I can keep that sensor in service, or if I have to use the dpf temperature probe... but I think it's possible to still drive the exhaust gas temperature gauge in the information display and get it to react to all temperature ranges instead of just reporting one temperature for a range.



Be careful with that, some of the egt data the ecm puts out is not sampled, it is calculated. ie, ecm thinks it's getting this much fuel and this much air, table says it should have an egt of this.

This is such a tired argument, despite having a measure of truth to it. Engines are air pumps. How much air is pumped through them is what matters, not the physical displacement of the engine. A turbocharged 5.0L at 2:1 pressure ratio is going move a similar, if not more mass of air than a naturally aspirated 10.0L. The 10.0L comes with some stark disadvantages, larger, heavier components, weaker components, more friction and more heat losses.

The 10L is obviously heavier, due to being a larger displacement. The pistons are larger, the cylinders are larger. The cylinder walls must be thicker to accommodate the larger total forces to be absorbed. As is well known, as the inside diamter of a cylinder gets larger, it will eventually reach a point where the total force against against it is greater than the pressure contained within it. Smaller cyclinders are stronger by virtue of having to withstand less pressure across a smaller surface area. Larger cylinders condense a larger portion of the combustion gases, meaning more energy is dumped into the engine as heat instead of leaving the engine as work.



What do you know about the engines? Just because you drove a vehicle with an engine doesn't mean you know anything about that engine. How many diesel engines have you been inside? How much of the math have you done to size turbos for diesel and gasoline engines. Experience does not equal knowledge at all times. As I mentioned above, the engine is an air pump. You realise that the ISV red lines at 4250rpm and doesn't start pulling back power until ~3800rpm? At 30psig, that's a lot of air being moved.

The ISV is a significantly different diesel engine than its direct peers. I can't speak to the ford 3.0L v6, or the duramax 3.0, but the big powerstrokes, the duramax and the isb/bt6 are not in the same class of engine as the ISV.

The ISV is an over-square dual over head cam v8. Big focus on the over square. Almost all heavy duty diesel engines are under-square, meaning the stroke is longer than the diameter of the cylinder. The ISV is the other way, the stroke is shorter than the diameter of the cylinder. This has some interesting effects, an over-square engine favors higher rpm, under-square favors lower rpm. This is due to the piston velocity and the relationship to the combustion velocity. There are some disadvantages, such as in low rpm, high torque situations the connecting rod and crank shaft are at a mechanical disadvantage, there is a lot of stress there. They pretty much need a common rail fuel injection system to soften the combustion process or it would end up like the triple nickle did...

Now lets have a moment of honesty. The ISV is too large of an engine for the Titan XD as a half-ton pickup and would be perfect if the XD was a full one-ton. Modern diesels in the 2500/3500 series pickups are massively over powered for the job they're required to do. Drive the rockies, and I'd argue they're dangerously overpowered. "No replacement for displacement" is a simple way of saying "I don't want to figure out the right tool for the job, so let's just go overkill and hope for the best".
If your opinion was fact, why do most semi trucks, large industrial machines, ships, locomotives, large agricultural equipment, etc., etc., have large displacement engines?
Your engine comparison is biased, your data is skewed, your findings have no basis in fact. If there was any reality to your opinion then you would be able to show evidence. I would imagine one could design a vehicle that would run using a weed eater engine. I doubt that its service would be long, and the speed at which it traveled would likely be less than speedy.
I never mentioned naturally aspirated engines. Comparison between forced and N.A. is not at issue. Displacement.
Size matters.
Surely you don't think that your Titan can pull a 25,000lb trailer through the Rockies, consistently, as well as a 1 ton Duramax and not have a meltdown.
Size matters.
 

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I always thought an EGT probe should be installed in the exhaust manifold before the turbo. The reason being that you keep an eye on the temperature that could be dangerous to the life of the turbo. My Titan only has what looks to be an exhaust emissions temperature gauge without any numbers. Just a bar graph L to H. I will try to check in to that at some point.

If your opinion was fact, why do most semi trucks, large industrial machines, ships, locomotives, large agricultural equipment, etc., etc., have large displacement engines?
Your engine comparison is biased, your data is skewed, your findings have no basis in fact. If there was any reality to your opinion then you would be able to show evidence. I would imagine one could design a vehicle that would run using a weed eater engine. I doubt that its service would be long, and the speed at which it traveled would likely be less than speedy.
I never mentioned naturally aspirated engines. Comparison between forced and N.A. is not at issue. Displacement.
Size matters.
Surely you don't think that your Titan can pull a 25,000lb trailer through the Rockies, consistently, as well as a 1 ton Duramax and not have a meltdown.
Size matters.
What in the hell are you talking about with all that? Where did I say anything about what you’re talking about
 

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2019 Titan XD Pro4x Cummins
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I always thought an EGT probe should be installed in the exhaust manifold before the turbo. The reason being that you keep an eye on the temperature that could be dangerous to the life of the turbo. My

If your opinion was fact, why do most semi trucks, large industrial machines, ships, locomotives, large agricultural equipment, etc., etc., have large displacement engines?
Your engine comparison is biased, your data is skewed, your findings have no basis in fact. If there was any reality to your opinion then you would be able to show evidence. I would imagine one could design a vehicle that would run using a weed eater engine. I doubt that its service would be long, and the speed at which it traveled would likely be less than speedy.
I never mentioned naturally aspirated engines. Comparison between forced and N.A. is not at issue. Displacement.
Size matters.
Surely you don't think that your Titan can pull a 25,000lb trailer through the Rockies, consistently, as well as a 1 ton Duramax and not have a meltdown.
Size matters.
Egt before the turbo is ideal, you are correct.

Displacement is only part of the equation, not the only part. There has been an on-going trend to move to smaller displacement diesel engines in class 8 trucks for all but the heaviest loads. There is always a point where the work load requires more displacement. With our trucks, that isn’t the case. Yes, I wouldn’t think twice to pull a 25k goose neck if my truck could lawfully pull it. My dad pulls super-bs with a 12 liter. Quite a few of the new paccar engines in their fleet. They’re phasing out their x15s.

The isv is in the same torque and hp range of early duramax, powerstroke and isb/bt6s. So…
 

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1930's my ass. If the 5.0 were all you say, it would still be in production. I live in reality. Not fantasy.
I may not be a P.E. with an expensive college education, but I do know a little about physics. Compressed air produces heat. Heat kills engines at some point. The faster it is compressed...and shit like that.
Technology cannot change the laws of physics. Friction, gravity, object in motion, rest....shit like that.
As long as you move shit on this planet, it will take force. More force/leverage you have more shit you can move.
Out.
 

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1930's my ass. If the 5.0 were all you say, it would still be in production. I live in reality. Not fantasy.
I may not be a P.E. with an expensive college education, but I do know a little about physics. Compressed air produces heat. Heat kills engines at some point. The faster it is compressed...and shit like that.
Technology cannot change the laws of physics. Friction, gravity, object in motion, rest....shit like that.
As long as you move shit on this planet, it will take force. More force/leverage you have more shit you can move.
Out.
The reason the 5.0 is no longer in production is Nissan failed to market it and it’s much too large of an engine for a half ton. What I’ve seen in the ecm calibration has shown me that. It’ll hold 70mph at 0psig indicated. This engine has lots more to give, but it’s strangled by emissions. Almost every problem this engine has falls back on the emissions garbage.
 
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