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Did any note that the stock diesel packs 310 horsepower while the warrior xd concept packs 390 horsepower from the same engine.

This speaks well of the tuning potential

Any thoughts
 

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Only place I see reference to 390hp is when talking about the optional gas endurance V8. Where is this 390hp in the diesel comment coming from. I wonder if just a reporter who isn't up on his data.
 

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yeah i saw that too...i wonder if it was a typo or if its getting tuned up? 390 out of the diesel would be great....thatd put torque around 600 right?
 

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390hp refers to the gasser.
 

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You guys néed to go the Edge, bullydog,banks, sites and see why we think it is easily possibe. Or better yet if you watch the diesle power challenge on YouTube. You can see the potential of a diesle power plant at extream mods getting 26mpg. Even a aftermarket airintak nets 30 to 50 hp in some applications.
 

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The ISV has a fantastic head and intake design. It's going to be able to breath very well, it'll still be the same volume of air just greater mass. That's the benefit of forced induction.

My expectation is that the ISV is going to make all the other V8 diesels in the pickup market obsolete.
 

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Obsolete how?
ISB, Duramax and the Powerstroke are all pushrod engines with complicated valve train arrangements.

The ISB has a pretty industrial intake design which did not focus on the airflow characteristics.

I don't have enough experience with the 6.7L PSD, however from what pictures I've seen online the intake path is a bit more of a compromise to allow for the inboard exhaust ports. Having the turbo closer to the exhaust ports is an advantage though.

The newest Duramax I have experience with was a 2008 LMM. Fantastic engine but also the second oldest engine in the pickup market. I consider the ISB the oldest because while displacement and much of the engine was updated, it's still the same engine family and design language. It wasn't a substantial departure from the 5.9L.

I have great respect for engines that have a long production life, proving the engineers knew what they were doing. However every once and a while someone comes along and upsets the cart. The 3.0 ecodiesel has similiar design features to the ISV but it's too small to be a real player as a towing engine.

The ISV has chain driven dual over head cams with a fully rollerized valve train for less parasitic loss. Look at the valve arrangement, the valves are all parallel to the cam shafts. This reduces the number of unique parts. It is over-square, meaning it can take advantage of advanced fuel injection systems, insuring all the diesel is burned in a shorter stroke. It's a 5.0L engine so due to the smaller bore, the area the head bolts need to clamp is reduced. What appears to be large bolts with oversized flanges further distributes the clamping force. 5.0Ls is also just enough displacement that if you increase the pressure ratio you can make some real power.

The intake design is where I believe we see some influence or perhaps inspiration from Nissan.

On current pushrod 32 valve diesels the valves are rotated about the cylinders to improve the swirl effect. This is where the ISV stands out. By having what appears to be a tuned intake system with siamese ports the valves can be arranged parallel to the camshafts. With correct tuning the velocity of the intake charge can be increased as it approaches the valve. The higher velocity would increase the momentum of the gas and it would try to continue the same way that it was coming out of the ports. This would improve swirl and the volumetric efficiency of the engine. Just because the charge air is at a higher pressure than ambient, doesn't mean it can't benefit from thoughtful intake design.

I have a Q45 with the Nissan VH45, it has a very similar intake design with tuned length ports. Mine is a later model where they discontinued the siamese ports. It has incredible torque right up to 4000rpm, where it has a little dead spot and then horsepower takes over. A diesel engine has a much narrower RPM band to have to tune for. ISV: 4200-1200=3000RPM, VH45DE 6900-1200=5700RPM

I think it's going to be the tuners who unlock the potential of the ISV, they are going to be what sells the Titan XD. They've got it all hyped up as a heavy duty half ton but what it really is, is a strong, blank canvas for the tuners.
 

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That's a heck of a post. However, none of that says the others are obsolete. Pushrod engines have been sufficing just fine since the first autos hit dirt two-tracks well over 100 years ago, and continue to do just fine. Look at the LS series and 3rd gen Hemi; I'd stack those two up against any OHC engine made, ever (especially the LS). From power, efficiency, emissions, whichever metric one wants to use to compare, those two can walk the walk and talk the talk.

You are correct, the Cummins is the oldest in the truck market; when you look at it, it's not that different from '89. Obvious injection system changes and the move to a 24v head for mid-MY'98. But, old doesn't mean worn out or out of life; heck the Hemi still dominates Top Fuel 50 years after it debuted.

The Duramax is second oldest; it's pretty much the same engine from '01. Relatively minor changes along the way, but the architecture is the same.

The 6.7 Powerstroke is....and I hate to say this as I really dislike Fords (REALLY), but the 6.7 is the best Powerstroke ever made. Especially since they ditched that gimmicky POS dual-compressor turbo for the Garrett GT37 for MY'15, it's looking to be a longterm platform for Ford.


Now, in a perfect world I would like to see the ISB reconfigured with compound turbos and maybe a move to overhead cams; the old reliable inline 6 monster isn't dead yet.

Rumors are rampant about a huge upgrade to the Duramax; I'm excited to see what it consists of.


But the big three engines aren't going anywhere, certainly not obsolete. If, IF, Nissan made an actual 3/4 ton pickup, the ISV would be in a world of hurt against the larger engines. Even more so if (IF) Nissan made an actual 1 ton pickup. I don't see the ISV hauling 30k lbs all day and lugging it over the Rockies like the other three (certainly not at its current power ratings, the other three would just kill it). All the props to Cummins for the ISV, but it's still unproven and stacked against the other three, can't hold a candle in the work world.

Now, the light duty market? Arguably it could be cornered on the engine alone. But, the pricing structure Nissan has really is a hindrance to the ultimate success of the XD I feel.
 
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Something can be obsolete and still be a good product.

The point I'm getting to is that from a technology standpoint the ISV is a truly modern diesel engine, while the other engines available are a good generation behind.

Dodge needed a marketing gimmick and the Hemi fit that mold. GM stuck with the pushrod V8 because, well, GM. In that sense Ford, Toyota and Nissan have modern gasoline engines.

It wasn't that long ago that a person would put 18,000 lbs of load behind a 6,000lbs truck with only 400 ft.lbs of torque. Yes it would slow down on the hills, but it would still pull the grade. So the potential is there, waiting to be unlocked.
 

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Something can be obsolete and still be a good product.


It wasn't that long ago that a person would put 18,000 lbs of load behind a 6,000lbs truck with only 400 ft.lbs of torque. Yes it would slow down on the hills, but it would still pull the grade. So the potential is there, waiting to be unlocked.
Doing a lot of reading and studying. Get this.

The Nissan Titan Cummins has more HP & Torque than Gen 1 LB7 & LLY Duramax, and same HP but only 50 Ftlb torque less than LBZ Duramax.

Translation, basically same power that was in 1 ton HD Chevy for many years not too long ago.
 

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Doing a lot of reading and studying. Get this.

The Nissan Titan Cummins has more HP & Torque than Gen 1 LB7 & LLY Duramax, and same HP but only 50 Ftlb torque less than LBZ Duramax.

Translation, basically same power that was in 1 ton HD Chevy for many years not too long ago.
Look up the numbers on the 5.9 Cummins from around 2004 or so.
 

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I had a 2003 RAM 2500 HO. It weighed 7150 with 3/4 of a tank, made 305/550 at the crank and 251/510 at the wheels. When it went to the next life it weighed 7300 and made 497/920 at the wheels. my PRO4 is supposed to weigh 7300 and change with 310/555.
 
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