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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the way to dinner with a lovely lady, I had a very disconcerting sight on my cluster:



Yeah. P2263 " turbocharger/supercharger boost system performance". The reader also tossed C1130 "engine signal 1."

I see from @Footloose's experiences with P2263 at the very beginning of his truck's life, there were 3 basic options Nissan and/or Cummins pointed to:

1) Loose intercooler pipe clamps (this was a "known issue" per Nissan but didn't fix it for him):

Just picked it back up. Apparently the intercooler piping clamps were loose from the factory and they said it's an issue that Nissan is aware of.
2) the actuator on the turbo is bad and needed replacing (false, in his case):

So they're replacing the RTC valve this morning. (Rotary Turbine Control).

Hopefully this will cure the check engine light, dip in power between 2nd and 3rd gears, and diesel exhaust inside the cabin during regens.
3) the ECM needed updated software, which seems to have solved it (and which I already have on my truck, and have had for over a year probably):

So the "fix" was updated software that they're going to be rolling out nationwide soon I'm sure. So for those of you that already have the truck you may experience the check engine come on in the future and they'll have to update software. Apparently I'm the 1st XD with this software so let's see how long this lasts lol

_____


So.

I went out and did a visual inspection. No loose intercooler connections (at least according to wiggling each in turn - they were all approximately the same).

Then I remembered - last time I emptied the Mishimoto catch can, I had ONE **** OF A TIME getting it loosened. So I intentionally left it slightly loosen. This evening, it is noticeably more open and has oil spray visible...



... which isn't surprising, though I wasn't expecting it to shimmy down so quickly. I Tri-Flow'd the threads, tightened it up all the way, and cleared the code. Test starting the truck = no CEL, yet. I am sure it won't pop again until I am under power.

I suspect the catch can caused this code, and hopefully that means I can cease having a heart attack.

Any other ideas about what I might try pre-dealership, if this comes back? Is there any way I can personally check that actuator?
 

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Well i dont know my code but yesterday i started my truck to head away for a few days with my wife and daughter AND to have my tailgate fixed and my updates that i havent gotten done in a year of ownership of my 16 pro4x diesel,and my check engine light came on. Ill know more about it today but thats the first time for me at 15000 kms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The TSB that has that code as one potential issue is NTB16-037d
Any chance you have the full content of that TSB (assuming you're responding to my initial post)? And in general, is there a good way to get the PDFs for these TSBs?

I feel like a central repository of them here on the forums would be super helpful.
 

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your first mistake was installing the PoS. Why would you install a catch can at stock levels components. you literally just void a warrant for no gain what so ever. I can see if you decided to do this if you modded the truck but this was completely r e tarded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
your first mistake was installing the PoS. Why would you install a catch can at stock levels components. you literally just void a warrant for no gain what so ever. I can see if you decided to do this if you modded the truck but this was completely r e tarded.
What a thoughtful and helpful message - I can't decide whether to thank you more for your grammar and orthography, or your constructive commentary!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nissan Titan XD - traction control / slipping light staying on

The week has been a mess. Related issues, I would wager, to my initial post here... so I am going to add this in case it happens to anyone else.

In short: I had a 6 gallon canister of spare diesel fuel burst in the bed, on Sunday afternoon. I drove ~70 miles after it happened so it thoroughly dripped and drained. Being an oil, though, the diesel stuck to many things. I was out of time and it was well below freezing, so it had to sit overnight without a proper cleaning.

Monday night I start it up to go to the self-serve car wash near my house, and the traction light is on. And staying on. The truck is shifting VERY HARD after each gear, on snow and on dry pavement. In 2x4 and in 4x4. My initial thought is: this is related to the damned diesel fluid, which finally dripped and dropped into the speed sensors or some other component.

A scan of the truck gave 2 pending OBDII codes...

P0106 [generic cause is intake manifold pressure incorrect]
P22CD [generic cause is turbo outlet valve stuck open]

... and a single active ABS code:

C1130 [generic cause is anything from faulty ECM... to a faulty ABS actuator... to CAN BUS errors]

With this data, then, I had all the wrong clues for the situation.

I again cleaned the rear wheels, hubs, brake components, and then cracked open the rear wheel speed sensors (if you have any salt near you... I have no idea what the torque on these bolts is supposed to be, but plan on having a damned breaker bar close at hand):

Driver side rear speed sensor:



Driver's side rear wheel hub:



Passenger rear sensor wire, completely free of any diesel fuel on the wiring boot:



The O-rings both had some rust on them, but the sensors were bone dry. No diesel there. The hubs inside were clean (not dry, they had gear oil on them which is good) and free of contamination with diesel.

So what the ACTUAL **** is causing the traction light to stay on, and yet 4x4 is not binding, and the drive train visibly works correctly when shifting in park........

Thanks to the intuition of @XDHunter, it turns out that the oh-so-obvious cause of drive train components... is actually an emissions concern.

He suggested I recheck every connection in the motor and under the truck, because modern diesels are tending to throw drivetrain codes and lights when it thinks emissions tampering is happening.

Sure enough. The silicone boot on the air intake tube to the top of the motor... was tightened sufficiently but the tube had shifted to its side. This means that high speeds would cause the boot to flex and the air intake pressure would be SIGNIFICANTLY incorrect for moments (likely why the OBDII codes above were "pending" rather than active).

I righted the air intake tube, and tightened the worm drive clamp thoroughly. I cleared the existing codes and have driven approximately 50 miles tonight, a mix of city and highway driving. The traction light went out and stayed out; the shifts are back to 100% normal; 2x4 and 4x4 work correctly and shift effortlessly back and forth. No CEL or dash lights of any sort. No return of the pending codes, either.

This is a huge relief, as it meant no removing aftermarket parts in order to take it to the stealership.

This may even be the actual cause for my initial P2263 code. The catch can being slightly loose may even be a red herring like the diesel fuel spill.

TOO LONG TO READ SUMMARY: if you have the traction light come on/stay on and find pending codes related to intake manifold pressure - you almost certainly have an air leak in the intake system and NOT any driveline issues. I have posted all of this to help anyone who may end up in a similar situation... because it was mighty disconcerting to Google these codes + "Titan XD" and find no useful hits.

Even shorter (NSFW) summary of how I feel about chasing drivetrain issues all week because of the entirely unrelated, coincidental diesel fuel spill:

 

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Good work tracking it down and getting some positive results. Its great having guys like xdhunter,BigRed and a bunch of other guys that are so helpful and knowledgeable about these systems.
Hope it stays working!
 

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I righted the air intake tube, and tightened the worm drive clamp thoroughly. I cleared the existing codes and have driven approximately 50 miles tonight, a mix of city and highway driving. The traction light went out and stayed out; the shifts are back to 100% normal; 2x4 and 4x4 work correctly and shift effortlessly back and forth. No CEL or dash lights of any sort. No return of the pending codes, either.

This is a huge relief, as it meant no removing aftermarket parts in order to take it to the stealership.

This may even be the actual cause for my initial P2263 code. The catch can being slightly loose may even be a red herring like the diesel fuel spill.

TOO LONG TO READ SUMMARY: if you have the traction light come on/stay on and find pending codes related to intake manifold pressure - you almost certainly have an air leak in the intake system and NOT any driveline issues. I have posted all of this to help anyone who may end up in a similar situation... because it was mighty disconcerting to Google these codes + "Titan XD" and find no useful hits.
Glad you found the issue;)
I had loose clamps on the intercooler plumbing as well...although no lights since I caught them in time maybe. The MAP/Boost pressure/Crank case pressure sensors are pretty sensitive on these trucks. Any mods to the PCV/EVAP plumbing, loose fittings or plumbing in the charge air system, any reduction of manifold pressures even a few percent, lights the dash up almost immediately. Back before CAN you had slower data networks and sensors that had much less resolution and response time (sensitivity). With the advent of CAN and the drive for engineers to increase performance/efficiency as much as possible, they had to come up with more stringent controls and sensors to accurately adjust engine parameters to changing atmospheric conditions and loads to satisfy the emissions requirement thresholds. Unfortunately it's a blessing and a curse, great that the powertrain is almost always "Dialed In" for the sake of efficiency, but a curse that if you so much as fart in the wrong direction, you get a reminder. Couple that to the fact that this system is constantly talking to various other boxes and modules....so a seemingly simple problem like an air leak can have you chasing your tail for hours. Happens the same way with aviation....bus errors or bad wiring in ARINC 429 results in the same headaches and your under loads more pressure with butts in the seats getting operators from A to B.

To the point of the traction control issue and shift issues....the TCS and TCM uses the same manifold pressure sensors, turbo speed sensors, transmission input/output shaft speeds, wheel speeds, and other inputs in the calculations for perceived torque for power reduction since there is not the same correlation from the go-pedal to something like throttle valve (TPS) on a gasser or timing to pull. So our diesels, any degradation in manifold pressure, RTC position changes, compressor speeds above a learned rpm value (making up for lost air) plays havoc here. To top it off, the TCS uses the ABS system to control wheel speed, yaw, and sway, which having bad info from other systems would red flag as well. They all talk...so kinda crazy how one effects the other.
Sounds like you got'er licked though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Seems to have a significant amount of rust!
Yeah... Northeast Ohio winter roads are saltier than the average Cleveland Browns fan after EVERY SINGLE GAME.

Which is salty enough to cause high blood pressure!

Glad you found the issue;)
...

Unfortunately it's a blessing and a curse, great that the powertrain is almost always "Dialed In" for the sake of efficiency, but a curse that if you so much as fart in the wrong direction, you get a reminder. Couple that to the fact that this system is constantly talking to various other boxes and modules....so a seemingly simple problem like an air leak can have you chasing your tail for hours.

...

To the point of the traction control issue and shift issues....the TCS and TCM uses the same manifold pressure sensors, turbo speed sensors, transmission input/output shaft speeds, wheel speeds, and other inputs in the calculations for perceived torque for power reduction since there is not the same correlation from the go-pedal to something like throttle valve (TPS) on a gasser or timing to pull.
I too am glad; I take your advice literally, and will do a better job at aiming farts AWAY from the TCM :grin2:

I will update here if anything of these sorts come back to haunt me.
 

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Yeah... Northeast Ohio winter roads are saltier than the average Cleveland Browns fan after EVERY SINGLE GAME.

Which is salty enough to cause high blood pressure!



I too am glad; I take your advice literally, and will do a better job at aiming farts AWAY from the TCM :grin2:

I will update here if anything of these sorts come back to haunt me.
Lol! Those nose burners are always causing trouble. Speaking of haunting, nothing stays with you more than when your trapped in close quarters driving with your team in an APC loaded up on MRE's and sweating you a** off and someone decides to cash-in thee 'ol fart card. Almost borders PTSD (disclaimer, not making light PTSD...don't want someone blowing up this thread because they can't handle word play or my poor attempt at potty humor)....no windows to roll down, no A/C...just a fan blowing it around and 100+ degrees behind plate steel and grown men gagging and laughing hysterically. Gotta keep the mood light down range after a crappy day...Still have flashbacks:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A significant set of updates, as I haven't had the time to write it down.

I took my truck to the dealership, and here is the write-up I did for them. This includes content already called out in this thread, but I am reproducing it here for ease of reading:

my write-up for the Nissan dealership said:
Issue #1
NTB16037 (NTB16-037d) – occurred during regeneration
OBDII: P2263 & P0299, P22CD
ABS code: C1130 “engine signal 1”


1) First time (P2263, C1130, occurred without warning – flat territory, slow speed, stop and go traffic, odo = 28872) – 3/6/18, cleared codes with reader, solved by tightening catch can.
2) Second time (P2263, P22CD, occurred after sitting 24 hours (and that was after a lengthy highway drive from Mechanicsburg PA to Cleveland OH, odo = ~29100) – 3/12/18, cleared codes, caused Traction Light, solved by reseating air intake tube
3) Third time (P2263, P0299, occurred during regen, ~29600) – 3/24/18, cleared codes, caused Traction Light, solved by reseating MAF sensor plugs


Issue #2
P00B7 low coolant flow
ABS code C1130 “engine signal 1”


1) First time (P00B7, C1130, occurred most of the way back from Pittsburgh after clearing the other codes above, odo = ~29700) – 3/24/18, cleared codes, saw visibly low coolant level – added distilled water to expansion tank.


Oil analysis report (oil prior to oil change, at 29290 miles) came back indicating significantly high levels of potassium = coolant contamination in oil. No visibly coolant leaks, so this is almost certainly the EGR leaking internally.


Smell of coolant on exhaust last night’s drive (3/27/18), no new codes.
Speaking of the oil analysis after my third oil change the other week...



... it does indeed show a significantly higher level of coolant contamination, in the form of potassium, jumping to ~4.5 times previous levels. Sample #1 was from ~9600 miles ago, at the second oil change on the truck.

They are going to drain the coolant, remove the EGR cooler, and do the pressure/vacuum test to try and determine if there are any microfractures inside the EGR cooler. Even if I get stuck with the bill on the coolant flush they will do, that isn't the worst thing in the world, to have found a very knowledgeable, trustworthy, pro-modification Nissan tech... and 10 minutes from my house.

A couple of interesting comments from the tech (who did 20 years in the Army as a diesel mechanic, and has been at Nissan for the 5 years since then). I reproduce these are useful specifically with the issues I am facing, but also in general (the guy clearly knows his stuff, he is doing everything he can to hide my added filters for coolant, oil, air to be able to do warranty work for me - because he was in the Army, and he understands the goal of making a diesel run longer). I am solely putting this here for discussion - I can only report what I heard, and not necessarily corroborate any of what follows:

Dennis the Nissan diesel tech said:
1) NEVER add water to the coolant tank. Only add the correct coolant in its premixed form, regardless of climate or operating conditions. Plan to have a gallon of their coolant in the vehicle for the future, as this is something which cannot be stressed enough.
2) Nissan vehicles in general appear to like to slowly sip coolant, from brand new, and without any deleterious effects. He knows as they routinely top off all Nissan vehicles coolant when doing oil changes, and working the same cars for 5 years at this dealership he hasn't seen any issues (a lot of these are Maximas with over 200,000 miles on them now). Although this is a Cummins engine, he suspects that like the other Nissan lineup, there may be some amount of coolant consumption which is to be expected... but not with oil contaminated by coolant.
2b) His general rule of thumb is to make a permanent marker line on the expansion tank, and then check every 4000-5000 miles. Up to 3/4" of movement and loss is normal and can just be refilled. 1" or more of coolant loss is indicative of a bigger problem worth investigating.
3) The codes P00B7 and P22CD I pulled above with my OBD2/ABS reader... are not actually Nissan codes. This might be a case of Cummins codes popping that Nissan's ECM software on top doesn't know what to do with - but the CEL came on, so their reader would pull something if I had left the codes on.
4) My turbo boost issues are either one or two different TSBs, the numbers of which he didn't have in front of him when I was up there to check on things. He initially thought my turbo was under a recall, but the diagnostics show these TSBs are a live problem for my truck. The fact that air intake/MAF sensor reseating helped the Traction Light stay off may be circumstantial.
Also from Dennis: the Mishimoto coolant filter plumbing isn't good for this motor. The metal nipple on the side of the EGR cooler is specifically meant to burp air from that system, into the expansion tank... so routing it to the filter first isn't good. It needs to be routed directly as my hand is showing:

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got the truck back this morning, and I am rather pleased with the results.

I will reproduce my notes I took from the tech's explanation this morning (all 5 digit numbers are the associated TSB):

Coolant leak couldn't be replicated, pressurized prior to the normal service, then while cold, then while hot

16907 turbo service was done fully,


ECM update 17060 and 16095, which should cover the balance of known TSB issues at this time. Updated from ECM software 43b to 45d, so skipped several versions of the ECM


Retorqued the crank bolts 17098 and the belt isn't walking any longer


16116 for any reappearance of C1130 means I would need to come back if I see C1130 again, because the ECM would likely need replaced. First step the ABS takes when receiving faulty ECM signals, in order to protect all the computers/other systems... actually includes shutting off safety systems to avoid them going off when they shouldn't. Better to have no ABS, traction control, or VDC... than to have the right front brake activate itself incorrectly when going 80mph.
In other words...

1) the coolant leak was not fully cleared up, in spite of his doing ~3 times what their pressurized test required. He also did me the favor of testing with and without the Mishimoto coolant filter, and found no pressure loss differential. There is the live chance that this fracture is truly micro-hairline in size, and only flexes during regeneration (which occurred two weekends ago, when the latest batch of codes sprung up including the P00B7 coolant code... which isn't a legitimate Nissan code!).

2) the turbo boost leak issues (particularly P2263), even if fixed temporarily as I did above, were almost certainly all correctly pointing to the ECM needing flashed. This newest version, though I have only driven ~50 miles with it, seems to be doing a better job of idling smoothly; selecting the correct gear faster and more crisply; eliminated (at least in 50 miles of test driving) the issue of rolling towards a stop and then trying to accelerate again which used to cause the truck to struggle to pick the gear on different inclines.

3) I will be bringing beers up to the service department tomorrow, specifically for the tech and my service advisor. A lot of beers.

The weekend and hitting 30,000 miles shall include a tire rotation and alignment; fuel filters; transfer case fluid; checking the rear differential fluid with the handy dipstick; and generally just being so pleased to have diesel clatter back in my life after a 5 day separation. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Where is the summary of the tsbs you guys are always referring to?
I do not have a list of them, I refer to what I can find online (or in the quotes above, given to me by the tech directly). I wish the TSBs were searchable and freely available.

I have updates from Mishimoto's engineers about the coolant filter plumbing, vis-a-vis the Nissan tech's concerns of purging air:

Mishimoto engineering's first email said:
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica]I spoke with our engineers regarding your concern with the coolant filter kit and they confirmed there was no cause for alarm when it comes to air trapped in the system.

We tested this kit for 5,000 miles while doing other work on the cooling system that could have introduced air into the coolant and never had a problem with entrapped air.
The pressure of the coolant will still force any air out of the EGR cooler and up into the highest point in the system, which is still the degas/expansion tank.
[/FONT]
Mishimoto engineering's second email said:
[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica]I double checked with the engineers and they see no reason you couldn't intercept the hard-line rather than the EGR line.
It will still purge air properly but the overall efficiency of the filtering system may be slightly less in that location.
[/FONT]
So: I may end up re-routing the coolant filter plumbing to use the rigid return line from the radiator, I haven't decided yet. I do not know about the air purging EXACTLY as effectively when it is not just going directly up an unimpeded coolant hose to the expansion tank... versus running slightly downwards, through a filter, and then the extra distance back up to the expansion tank.

Updates to come, if and as they develop on this front.
 

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Honestly, I am not surprised to hear this happen with a Mishimoto product. The products they product while usually have a high level of quality are typically pretty useless and in some cases like this, actually detrimental. Most certainly steering clear of this company, not work the risk at all for such a minimal reward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Honestly, I am not surprised to hear this happen with a Mishimoto product. The products they product while usually have a high level of quality are typically pretty useless and in some cases like this, actually detrimental. Most certainly steering clear of this company, not work the risk at all for such a minimal reward.
Hold on - to be fair, this filter pulled a distressing amount of metal casting fragments/particulates out of my motor:

I am not at all associated with Mishimoto in any way but I do believe it is worth posting this followup.

After running the initial coolant filter for 45 days / 2100 miles, take a look at the metal particulates which came out of the coolant filter from just shaking it - not even cutting into it:







This is a bit concerning, yikes.

I am very, very glad I opted for the filter.
Their catch can pulls oil out of the intake system as well, so these two items are at the very least worth considering. I just wanted to post the Nissan tech's concerns and then Mishimoto's replies, for other folks to consider. I am not removing the coolant filter from my truck, but others might decide to pull it.
 

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Nissan Titan XD - traction control / slipping light staying on

The week has been a mess. Related issues, I would wager, to my initial post here... so I am going to add this in case it happens to anyone else.

In short: I had a 6 gallon canister of spare diesel fuel burst in the bed, on Sunday afternoon. I drove ~70 miles after it happened so it thoroughly dripped and drained. Being an oil, though, the diesel stuck to many things. I was out of time and it was well below freezing, so it had to sit overnight without a proper cleaning.

Monday night I start it up to go to the self-serve car wash near my house, and the traction light is on. And staying on. The truck is shifting VERY HARD after each gear, on snow and on dry pavement. In 2x4 and in 4x4. My initial thought is: this is related to the damned diesel fluid, which finally dripped and dropped into the speed sensors or some other component.

A scan of the truck gave 2 pending OBDII codes...

P0106 [generic cause is intake manifold pressure incorrect]
P22CD [generic cause is turbo outlet valve stuck open]

... and a single active ABS code:

C1130 [generic cause is anything from faulty ECM... to a faulty ABS actuator... to CAN BUS errors]

With this data, then, I had all the wrong clues for the situation.

I again cleaned the rear wheels, hubs, brake components, and then cracked open the rear wheel speed sensors (if you have any salt near you... I have no idea what the torque on these bolts is supposed to be, but plan on having a damned breaker bar close at hand):

Driver side rear speed sensor:



Driver's side rear wheel hub:



Passenger rear sensor wire, completely free of any diesel fuel on the wiring boot:



The O-rings both had some rust on them, but the sensors were bone dry. No diesel there. The hubs inside were clean (not dry, they had gear oil on them which is good) and free of contamination with diesel.

So what the ACTUAL **** is causing the traction light to stay on, and yet 4x4 is not binding, and the drive train visibly works correctly when shifting in park........

Thanks to the intuition of @XDHunter, it turns out that the oh-so-obvious cause of drive train components... is actually an emissions concern.

He suggested I recheck every connection in the motor and under the truck, because modern diesels are tending to throw drivetrain codes and lights when it thinks emissions tampering is happening.

Sure enough. The silicone boot on the air intake tube to the top of the motor... was tightened sufficiently but the tube had shifted to its side. This means that high speeds would cause the boot to flex and the air intake pressure would be SIGNIFICANTLY incorrect for moments (likely why the OBDII codes above were "pending" rather than active).

I righted the air intake tube, and tightened the worm drive clamp thoroughly. I cleared the existing codes and have driven approximately 50 miles tonight, a mix of city and highway driving. The traction light went out and stayed out; the shifts are back to 100% normal; 2x4 and 4x4 work correctly and shift effortlessly back and forth. No CEL or dash lights of any sort. No return of the pending codes, either.

This is a huge relief, as it meant no removing aftermarket parts in order to take it to the stealership.

This may even be the actual cause for my initial P2263 code. The catch can being slightly loose may even be a red herring like the diesel fuel spill.

TOO LONG TO READ SUMMARY: if you have the traction light come on/stay on and find pending codes related to intake manifold pressure - you almost certainly have an air leak in the intake system and NOT any driveline issues. I have posted all of this to help anyone who may end up in a similar situation... because it was mighty disconcerting to Google these codes + "Titan XD" and find no useful hits.

Even shorter (NSFW) summary of how I feel about chasing drivetrain issues all week because of the entirely unrelated, coincidental diesel fuel spill:

I have my truck in the shop right now as we speak for the same issue. They replaced a map sensor already and the light came back on. The truck is shifting hard and when I come to a stop the truck lunges foward. The truck does have a AFE power intake, tuned and deleted. I'm going to call dealer in the morning and have them take a look at the intake for air leaks. I sure am hoping this is my problem as well sir. Thanks for the post!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have my truck in the shop right now as we speak for the same issue. They replaced a map sensor already and the light came back on. The truck is shifting hard and when I come to a stop the truck lunges foward. The truck does have a AFE power intake, tuned and deleted. I'm going to call dealer in the morning and have them take a look at the intake for air leaks. I sure am hoping this is my problem as well sir. Thanks for the post!
Well - for me, I did not have the specific issues you report with lunging forward.

I will say: some subsequent issues ended up being an intermittently bad right rear wheel speed sensor (which was causing ~11 codes, 6 ABS and 5 CEL).
 
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