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For a stock tank it works as designed. We are talking about making a aftermarket tank with known issues work. Because obviously if you take time to read any of these threads the stock set up is not working with this tank and people are not being able to utilize the extra gallon's out of this tank. So yes the sump is a great idea because gravity works and will continue to work. Not to mention if someone is tuned and has larger injectors blah blah blah they can take advantage of the larger outlet than the factory draw straw to use larger fuel lines.
I've read all the threads and discussion on this tank and guess I'm a little confused. If the overall tank height of the aftermarket tank is no more than .25 inches difference from the factory tank in height then I'm not understanding what the percieved problem is everyone is talking about with pump starvation. The variance of .25 inches in height of a tank is not going to have that much of an impact IMO.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
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1,066 Posts
For a stock tank it works as designed. We are talking about making a aftermarket tank with known issues work. Because obviously if you take time to read any of these threads the stock set up is not working with this tank and people are not being able to utilize the extra gallon's out of this tank. So yes the sump is a great idea because gravity works and will continue to work. Not to mention if someone is tuned and has larger injectors blah blah blah they can take advantage of the larger outlet than the factory draw straw to use larger fuel lines.
I've read all the threads and discussion on this tank and guess I'm a little confused. If the overall tank height of the aftermarket tank is no more than .25 inches difference from the factory tank in height then I'm not understanding what the percieved problem is everyone is talking about with pump starvation. The variance of .25 inches in height of a tank is not going to have that much of an impact IMO.
It's not the height. It's the surface area of the bottom. Let me speak metric for a minute because SAE units are stupid

If you have a square container that is 10cm on a side, then the surface area of the bottom is 100 sqcm, so 100 cc of fluid will fill the container to a height of 1cm.

If you make the container 20cm long instead of 10, then the surface area of the bottom is now 200sqcm and the same 100 cc of fluid will only fill the container to a height of 0.5cm.

If we assume our 50gallon aftermarket tank is about twice as large as the OE tank in surface area, a given volume of fuel will only fill it to about half the height as the OE tank.

So, even if the starvation height is the same, the volume left in the tank when that happens is higher.
With you on the metric system...we should have switched when it became law in the 70s...
I can see where the longer bottom surface area could cause a problem on steep inclines (all the fuel at front or back of the tank) when tank is extremely low.
But if tank height is relatively the same and the pump height stays the same from the bottom there should be no issue under relatively normal operating conditions. Doesn't matter if the tank is 50 or 1000 gallons yes you would have more or less liquid volume but the pump doesn't know or care. It's designed to pump fuel from a predetermined min/max fluid level.
On the other hand I could see an issue if operating on a 7 grade for 5 miles if someone hit it almost empty?.
I still don't get how a sump in the center of the tank will solve this problem. If someone is so low on fuel that the length of the tank is "holding" all the fuel at one end during climb or descent the center sump won't correct that issue....unless you had two...at front and back??
 
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